Crocs and boors and friends, oh my!

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A couple of weeks ago, I bought my son a pair of crocs. Typically, I’d buy something like this from Amazon, but the size and color he wanted wasn’t available so I bought them directly from the Crocs website. Since then, I have received an email every single day from Crocs. The first one – apart from the order confirmation – was a welcome email thanking me for my support and promising to keep me posted on all their “best sales events, new product releases, unique discounts, and special offers.” I had no idea how diligently they would deliver on that promise to keep me posted. And, not that I buy crocs very often, but so far all they’ve done is train me that paying full price is a really stupid idea because I’m likely to get a 40 or 50% off email every day.

Except that I won’t get that email. I unsubscribed. I don’t want to get their lunch special, or to ‘stay connected and share the crocs love’, or even to ‘get comfortable with 50% off.’ Crocs has acted like what Nick, Josh, and I call a loudmouthed boor. We compare these boors to someone that comes to your house and won’t shut up –  talking about what’s important to him, without making any effort to understand what’s going on in your life. And, once a boor thinks he knows you, he’ll text you, email you, show up in your Facebook feed, and follow you all around town. If that sounds like your company’s approach, unfortunately, you’re not alone.

The alternative is to act like a friend – someone who considers what’s going on in your life and how they can help you. We interviewed Susan Fournier –  who next week will become the next dean of the Questrom School of Business – for Marketing to the Entitled Consumer. Together with Jill Avery of Harvard and John Wittenbraker of market research firm GfK, she penned a great HBR article that dives deep into the different types of friendships that people have with brands. We provide a synopsis in the boook, but the full article is well worth a read if you’re trying to shed your boorish ways.

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