Good customer support can instill loyalty

apple support

Although I own a lot of Apple products, I don’t consider myself a fan-boy. If anything, I’m constantly on the edge of giving up. Every time my Apple products don’t work the way they’re supposed to (isn’t ease-of-use a big part of the promise?) I start thinking about giving the Pixel phone a go or trying to work with a Surface or chromebook.

Usually, inertia takes over. I realize the effort it would take to manage and migrate my photos and music, and there’s the need to re-learn which way to scroll and which corner to click to minimize a window. None of it is insurmountable, but the magnetism of the new just isn’t strong enough to overcome the habits of the present (with a hat tip to Jobs to be Done research for this description).

But then I had a great customer support experience that guarantees my loyalty for the foreseeable future and raises the bar for the support team of every other company that I ever interact with. Without boring you with the technical challenge, I contacted Apple’s customer support team and, after some time, my case was escalated to a manager. As well as regular troubleshooting, at a couple of stages I had to send logs for him to forward to engineers.

When we first spoke, he told me that he would remain on my case until it was resolved. It took several days, but he was true to his word. What shocked me was his communication and tenacity. He told me exactly which days he was working and when he would follow up. He arranged specific times to call me and then called me at those times. He explained as much technical detail as I wished to know – and didn’t overwhelm or bore me with the rest. In short, he owned my case. He wouldn’t let go until it was resolved and I was satisfied.

My expecations of every company’s support are now so much higher, and my appreciation for Apple has pushed thoughts of Google, Microsoft, or Samsung to the very back of my mind.

How do you show you care?

Super Subs sign re Postmates.JPG

A few weeks ago, I was in Miami and needed to order lunch for my family. We had flamed out a couple of times with different local eateries, and I once again looked online for highly rated lunch places near us. I came across a sandwich place — Super Subs — that was close by and got four-and-a-half stars on yelp. But something seemed iffy about it. So, rather than call in an order or use a delivery service, I decided to drive there to either order or find an alternative.

When I got there, the store was bustling. There were some people sitting on stools around the perimeter, and it initially felt like you needed to be a regular to have any chance of decent service. Then, when it came time to give my order, I realized how wrong I had been. It wasn’t that they were treating regulars differently. They were treating every individual as though they were the most important person in the world. The questions were endless – they wanted to get every aspect of my order exactly right. They wanted me to avail of extras – not upsells, but additions that I might want and alternatives I might prefer. And, all of this was done with a huge smile and in the server’s second language.

While I was waiting for the order to be prepared, I noticed a sign to their customers. The language and grammar wasn’t perfect, but the sentiment was. It basically informs customers that mistakes made by Postmates (although Doordash also seems to deliver from the store) can’t be avoided by the store. The sign pointed out that “they only care about their delivery charge and we only care about your food being ordered correctly.” Here’s the thing — I believed them. I’ve had enough mediocre to lousy experiences with Postmates, Uber Eats, Delivery Dudes, and others to know that they don’t care. My experience with Uber Eats was so poor that I refuse to use the service again.

But, having experienced Super Subs first hand, I knew how much they cared about getting my order right. There was something so authentic about their store, their note, and their service. As they pointed out, they are not in control of their brand when a customer orders through an intermediary, and yet, they sometimes get the blame. That’s life, but their little sign brought a smile to my face. It reinforced the notion of authenticity and emphasized how much they care. In the era of social media, none of us fully controls our brand. But, we can be honest and authentic, and trust that this resonates with customers.

Oh, and next time you’re in Miami, check out Super Subs — just be sure to call in the order yourself, or to visit in person!