Why do entitled consumers rebel?

In our conversations with marketers and strategists, they often complain about consumers’ rising expectation levels. For many of them, calling consumers entitled is a pejorative term. We disagree. We think marketers need to change how they think AND how they behave to accomodate and engage with entitled consumers. Marketer behavior is so bad that we dedicate an entire chapter in Marketing to the Entitled Consumer to marketing overload.

There are lots of reasons – but for consumers, there are no excuses. Among the consumers we surveyed, 43% agree with the statement that, “Companies are lucky to get my attention and they should act like it.” And, for Fully Enittled consumers, that proportion rises to 59%.

Meanwhile, we bombard consumers with retargeted ads and assault their inboxes and mobile devices until they stop paying attention, and even seek out ways to block us from communicating with them. Marketing is not necessarily the enemy of a good customer experience, but unless it is carefully managed, it can be. When marketers are too focused on the bottom line and short-term results, they can go off course.

At their core, most marketers want to do the right thing. They want to make customers aware of products or services that will make them happier. The challenge has been to deliver on that promise in an efficient, and respectful way. That’s what Marketing to the Entitled Consumer is all about – how to stop bombarding your customers and to turn their unreasonable expectations into lasting relationships.

Who and where are entitled consumers?

Marketing to the Entitled Consumer goes on sale today. We’ll spend the next few days highlighting some of the major findings, conclusions, and recommendations in the book. Starting with a question posed by the book title. What exactly is an entitled consumer?

For a long time, our working description was consumers that consider themselves deserving of privelege and special treatment. And, we’ve always believed that entitled consumers are far from a threat to marketers. We don’t see the term as pejorative. We believe entitled consumers represent an opportunity. But, only if marketers adjust how they attempt to build relationships with them.

We wanted to gain a more complete understanding of today’s consumer, and to get beyond entitlement as an abstract idea. So, we surveyed 7,000 consumers in six countries (2,000 in the USA, and 1,000 each in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK) to better define and measure the concept. And we worked with outside experts (thank you KGR+C) to derive an Entitlement Factor from the data.

We were surprised by some of the findings. Most notably, entitlement is pretty much independent of traditional demographic categories. We expected to see a more hightened sense of entitlement among millennials, for example. But, we found limited differences according to generation, gender, socio-economic status, or education background.Entitlement segments 2x2

We found that entitlement is a synthesis of two related qualities, which we call hard and soft entitlement. Hard entitlement manifests in people making demands. Their basic attitude is “if you don’t give me what I demand, I’ll punish you.” Soft entitlement is related, but different. It’s reflected in people who are willing to share data to get better service, and expect companies to understand their needs. Their attitude is “I’ll help you give me what I want, because that’s what I’ve come to expect. When consumers demonstrate both hard and soft entitlement, we call them Fully Entitled.

Although the exact number of consumers in each category differs by country, our data indicates that more than two thirds of consumers are entitled – and we expect the trend to continue. And, since you can’t use traditional segmentation methods to identify them, we recommend that you treat everyone as entitled. Demanders will punish you if you don’t, Anticipators will leave in disappointment, and the Fully Entitled may do both. But, if treat them as though they are deserving of privelege and special treatment, you’ll be able to build profitable relationships with them. That’s what our book is all about!

 

On Sale Today!

Book cover with background

We will continue to share the major themes from the book over the next several days, but we hope you’ll want to learn more. We encourage you to purchase the book, and would love it if you’d leave us a review. Among other sources, you can find it here:

Marketing to the Entitled Consumer – so real, you can touch it (well, I can at least)

Marketing to the Entitled Consumer - the bookI just received my first copies of Marketing to the Entitled Consumer, which will be on the bookshelves on October 30.

After countless hours of deliberation, debate, writing, and editing – and then waiting – it’s finally real.

And, we only have 35 days to wait to see it on shelves and hear the reaction. Our goal has always been to spark a conversation — about consumers, what they want, and how brands can and should give it to them. We hope you’ll chime in on this site as part of that conversation.

We’ve launched a separate site which is dedicated to the book if you’d like to check that out. It gives a detailed view of what to expect in each chapter. We also hope that you’ll buy and give feedback on the book. It’s available for pre-order on Amazon, and wherever else you might buy books.

We have launch events and signings in London on October 4 and New York on October 17. Let Nick, Josh, or me know if you’d like to attend.

Humbly,

Dave

“Marketing to the Entitled Consumer” – the book

MTTEC CoverOne morning in Lisbon, Nick and I were sitting beside each other listening to an author talk about marketing effectiveness at a client conference. His presentation connected with the entire audience. So much so that we could almost hear minds opening and gears turning as a packed room of professionals listened, learned, and started to think differently about a new and exciting approach to their work. Something clicked inside the two of us and we looked at each other — almost in sync — and said, “we need to write a book.”

We had been in a months-long discussion about why forming durable connections with consumers was so hard, but it wasn’t until that moment that we realized that we wanted to formalize our thinking and contribute something to the debate. Three years later and with help from Josh Bernoff and an army of supporters, we’ve completed the manuscript and expect Marketing to the Entitled Consumer to be on bookshelves in October. Our hope is that we can connect with our readers as powerfully as that speaker did, sparking much needed change in how marketers engage with customers.

Our ideas come from marketers fashioning today’s consumer experiences, the experts who advise them, and from research with more than 7,000 consumers in the US and Europe, as well as focus groups in four countries. The consumer research helped us define and identify Entitled Consumers and what they expect from brands. We are extremely grateful to everyone that spoke with us and shared their ideas and perspectives for the book. None of this would have been possible without their help.

You can pre-order the book on Amazon. Our goal was to challenge the status quo, encouraging marketers to try something new by creating a roadmap for changing how to build relationships with entitled consumers. We hope you take look and let us know what you think by joining the discussion.